Featured Project: Kianda Towers – Angola

Kianda Towers – Angola

Description
Construction of four 12 story towers that will house a commercial center, offices and a patio with garden in Angola. Value: US$ 323m.

 

Status Region
Underway Angola
Category Value
Building R 100 million+
Industry Timing
Office & Commercial, Retail, Residential 2013 – 2017 Extended to 2020
Sector Class
Private Invited / Negotiated


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About Melanie Miles

One girl who would rather wear boots than high heels...

8 Interesting places to visit in Angola

Angola is a country situated in Southwestern Africa with a vast history of civil war and Illegal poaching. The name Angola comes from the word Ngola, which was an iron object that symbolized kingship among the Mbundu & Lunda people. A holiday in Angola with leave you mesmerised with the beauty of the cities, the tropical forests, Pasture lands and animals. I chose the 8 most beautiful places to visit in Angola.

1. Luanda
Luanda is the modern capital city located in Angola and it overlooks the Atlantic Ocean. The city is densely overpopulated but it has not lost its charm and the uniqueness of the city can never fade away. So when you are in Angola, never forget to visit Luanda.

2. Dilolo Lake
The Dilolo Lake is the largest lake located in Angola. The lake has certain mystic happenings that occur there. Legend has it some supernatural forces seem to cover the entire lake which prevents fishermen from fishing in the lake.

3. The Tunda Vala Fissure
The Tunda-Vala volcanic fissure, where you can climb to 2600m above sea level. The view of a sheer drop to sea level is quite spectacular. This area is perfect hiking. Don’t miss out on this wonderful destination.

4. Benguela
Benguela is a city in Western Angola, capital of Benguela Province. Benguela is one of Angola’s most populous cities with a population of 555,124 in the city. On the 13th August 2014 the Benguela Railway, in Angola, was reopened throughout, between the port of Lobito and the town of Luau. The devastating Angolan civil war, which lasted for 27 years, from 1976 to 2002, forced the closure of the entire railway line, except for the 34 km (21 mile) stretch between the coastal towns of Lobito and Benguela. This region has the friendliest people. There are various beautiful beaches located here. A must-see for every tourist!

5. The Arch Lagoon
The Arch Lagoon is located in Tombwa and is famous for the various rock formations in the Lagoon. This park has more than 2000 stone arches, in addition to more than a hundred soaring pinnacles, massive fins and giant balanced rocks. Do not miss the exotic wildlife species in the area. If you are looking for peace and serenity, Don’t miss the Arch Lagoons.

6. The Lobito
Lobito is a relatively new location and is known for the export and the harbour located in the region. There are numerous beaches situated in Lobito. There are many fine-dining restaurants where you can get a taste of the cuisines famous in the region. Lobito has perfect sunrises and sunsets.

7. Dala Waterfalls
What a spectacular sight to see the water coming down crashing on the rocks is a grand feat. A bridge built below the falls is something which is a place to visit. The Waterfalls capture many hearts of the visitors who give a visit to Angola.

8. Iona National Park
This is the largest national park in Angola. The park holds the best species of plants and animals that one can ever see. The Springbok, The Ostrich, are some of the indigenous species that you can find in the park. These are the best places in Angola which should be visited at least once in a lifetime.

Sources:
Sky Ticket
Travel Tour
Wikimedia
Heritage Portal
PX Here
Britannica

 


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Finding Diamonds in the Rough

 

Diamond in the rough
Photo cred : itsjonahhorst.deviantart.com

 

Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without one. – Confucius

For my blog this month, seeing as the subject is mining and diamonds I thought I would find some interesting facts on diamonds, where they are found, how they are mined and more:

The word diamond derives from the Greek word “adamas,” which means invincible or indestructible.

The largest diamond ever discovered was called the Cullinan diamond, and weighed in at an amazing 3106 carats, or 1.33 pounds. Discovered in 1905 in South Africa, the mine’s owner and the South African leaders gave the diamond to King Edward. The Cullinan was eventually cut into nine large diamonds and 100 smaller ones, and the three largest of these are on display in the Tower of London as part of the crown jewels.

Diamonds are formed hundreds of kilometers below the surface, as carbon is squeezed under intense temperatures and pressures. Kimberlite pipes bring the gems to the surface in eruptions that sometimes rise faster than the speed of sound. The pipes are rare. Of the more than 6000 known kimberlite pipes in the world, about 600 contain diamonds. Of these, only about 60 are rich enough in quality diamonds to be worth mining. West Africa has many “artisanal” operations in which people sift through river sediments for the occasional diamond eroded from a kimberlite pipe upstream. But a few pipes have been found in the thick jungle.

Africa is the world’s largest producer of diamonds, producing as much as 50% of global production. To date, Africa has produced over 75%, in value, of the world’s diamonds with more than 1.9 billion carats worth an estimated $US 158 billion mined. Angola, Botswana and South Africa are leading producers of diamonds.
Mining activities are centered around South Central Africa, with diamonds being produced primarily from kimberlite mines (South Africa, Angola, DRC, Ghana, Tanzania, Lesotho and Botswana), followed by alluvial dredging operations (Angola, CAR, Namibia and South Africa) and offshore marine diamond activities (South Africa and Namibia).

Before any actual mining even takes place, prospectors need to locate diamond sources first. To hit pay dirt and get to the larger sized rough crystals, geologists follow the trail of secondary diamond sources to determine where the primary sources of pipe deposits are.
Once the pipes are found and the presence of diamonds is proven true and profitable, shanks are inserted into the ground at the ore-bearing pipes and huge amounts of soil are extracted. In order to make mining efficient and effective, the raw rock and soil are typically not examined on-site.
Instead, they are transported to special plants where the ore is processed and the rough diamonds are extracted. Depending on how rich the ore is, a few hundred tons of ore might be sieved just to produce a single carat of gem quality rough diamonds.
Even after extraction, the precious gem is still far from being set in an engagement ring. Rough stones are then sorted into various gem-quality categories and industrial-specific grades. Thereafter, the roughs are sold, cut, polished and commercialised.

An estimated 10 million people globally are directly or indirectly supported by the diamond industry. From the countries where they are sourced to the countries where they are polished and sold, diamonds are supporting millions of people globally. In the African country of Namibia, the diamond mining industry is the largest single employer after the government. In Botswana approximately 25% of the labour force is directly or indirectly linked to diamonds.

“A Diamond is Forever” – NW Ayer Agency – One particular diamond producer got all the credit for this sentence that forever changed an industry, but the actual statement was delivered by an advertising agency. Before this impressive marketing campaign, diamonds were not necessary identified with romance, marriage or engagement. They were considered decorative jewellery and used for a variety of purposes. Then came the brilliant strategy of linking diamonds to the most sacred and beloved of American institutions; the wedding ceremony. However, one can’t truly say that prior to the 20th century, no lover had ever thought of diamonds as a romantic gift – in fact, one of the most famous diamond gifts in history was a diamond necklace given by Napoleon Bonaparte to Marie Louise.

And to end on a humorous note: “I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond.” ― Mae West

References:

http://www.mbendi.com/indy/ming/dmnd/af/p0005.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-pit_mining
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_mining_%28hard_rock%29

15 Amazing Facts about Diamonds

http://beyond4cs.com/faq/diamond-origins/how-they-are-mined/
http://news.sciencemag.org/africa/2015/05/rare-african-plant-signals-diamonds-beneath-soil
http://www.diamondfacts.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=86&Itemid=133&lang=en

About Marlaine Andersen

I have been working for Leads 2 Business, in the Private Projects Department, for 10 years this July. I am Deputy HoD for Private Projects. Researching mining projects and projects through-out the African continent are my areas of research and I find them most interesting.