Terrific Reasons to Hire a Contractor

So you want to build your own home? Perhaps you own a house already and want to modify or extend the existing space. Maybe you just want to add a swimming pool or a lock-up garage.

Many people undertake DIY construction projects without the consultation or employment of an experienced contractor. Many of these projects turn out to be successful, but can also come with various challenges.

If you want to remove the stress element, consider hiring a contractor for the following reasons.

  • Experience

Appoint a construction company that has a wealth of expertise in the industry. An experienced contractor will know exactly what is required for your project to be completed safely and within your budget and time frame.

  • Quality of Work

More often than not, experienced contractors have skilled in-house teams and external sub-contractor teams that have likely worked together on numerous projects. This provides you with peace of mind that your project will be carried out with quality workmanship.

  • Compliance with the Law

It would be wise to appoint a contractor who is an expert in complying with South Africa’s National Building Regulations (NBR). Your appointed contractor should know how to carry out the works by following these guidelines.

Reputable contractors in the home building industry should be registered with the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC). The NHBRC’s vision is “to be a champion of the housing consumer” and their mission is “to protect the housing consumers and to regulate the homebuilding environment.”

  • Insurance Cover

Should you ever encounter a problem with the structures in the future, your insurer will want to make sure that all legal regulations were adhered to during construction. If not, your claim/s could be rejected.

  • Warranties

Projects are undertaken by a contractor that is NHBRC certified and carry a 12-month warranty against roof leaks and a 5-year warranty against major structural defects.

The ultimate goal here would be to transform your living space into a place that works for you and your family, that is safe and that will last for many years to come. The above-mentioned points will hopefully assist you with the decision of whether or not to appoint a contractor for your next exciting project.

Happy planning!

 

 

Sources:
SANS 10400 Building Regulations
NHBRC
NHBRC warns consumers against fraudulent use of its logo
Property24
Dial A Contractor
Durbanville online directory


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About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Clever Marketing Strategies Retail Outlets use

Clever Marketing Strategies Retail Outlets use

Many years ago, my uncle had a general trading store in a little town called Komga in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. He was building his store up from scratch and had many items for sale. One particular item, a box of pens, had been sitting on the shelf, not selling and were priced at 99c each. He made a sign, wrote the word “Special – R 1.00 each”, put the box on the counter and all the pens were sold within a week.

My uncle’s strategy was visual (no mobiles and social media invented yet) but today’s retailers have many more options at their disposal. Many people are bargain hunters and the words “special” or “sale” are like homing beacons, calling us, tantalizing and convincing enough that sometimes, even if we don’t really need the item, we buy it cause we are getting it on “special”!

In this consumer driven world that we live in, we are bombarded from all sides with marketing ploys and adverts, specials, etc to convince you that THIS is the store, THIS is what I need. To draw the foot traffic into their stores, retailers have many options at their disposal and how they use them will determine if their strategies are working……

Retailers need to ensure that their STOREFRONTS are relevant and enticing, when it is a sweltering 40 degrees outside, gorgeous fur coats draped over the mannequins with lace up boots and scarfs will not set the right tone. INCENTIVES TO RETURN and a LOYALTY PROGRAM, this marketing strategy is widely used and is very successful. If I am faced with two shops, side by side, selling the same merchandise but one is offering me an incentive to enter, boy oh boy, that is the one I am going to choose, I mean, who does not want a free coffee while I browse through wonderful stuff that I don’t really need? And if buying something results in a “kickback” to me (loyalty points etc) that’s the way I am gonna go. SOCIAL MEDIA is a powerful tool utilised in retailer’s marketing strategies, promoting their in-store goods on line and even better when there is a limit to the special e.g. buy 2 leggings for R50, Special ends Monday. Goodness, best I get there right now, good price and it ends soon and I don’t want to miss out! Advertising on FACEBOOK, INSTAGRAM and pinning your goods to a PINTEREST board is always a good idea. REVIEWS! Personally I like to check reviews and they most certainly have an influence as to whether I wish to patronise that retailer or not. BRANDS, lets face it, a lot of people are brand conscious and a brand name beats a no-name brand any day! Retailers have a multitude of options at their fingertips and in order to succeed they need to stay one step ahead of their competitors.

Leads 2 Business takes great pride in producing relevant, comprehensive and updated information in the Construction Industry by publishing new tenders and projects on a daily basis. Our up-to-date, user friendly website is a breeze to operate and will save you time when looking to increase your order book. Do not miss out on this opportunity! For further information on our services please contact me on DebbieW@L2B.co.za , I look forward to hearing from you!

 

 

Sources:

Vendhq
Fitsmallbusiness.com
Wordstream
Shopify
CampaignMonitor
Pixabay


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About Debbie Wessels

Juggling a energetic, full of surprises life, working full time with two teenagers and hoping to still be sane and normal by the time I retire.

Simple Tips that will improve Vendor Responses

 

As the main contractor, your daily schedule involves plenty of organizing, planning, and meticulous work. In a busy world with a busy schedule, it is very easy to lose track of time and lose your objective for the day, even if it is just slight details or information that you need to obtain.
When you tender on a project (or a few), the stressful work can get a bit much, but never fear, as Leads 2 Business is here with a solution.

By using our L2Q Pricing Platform, life has become a little simpler in obtaining prices from various Vendors in just a few clicks.

Once a Bill of Quantities has been added onto your pricing platform profile, you can send Request for Quotes (RFQ’s) to various vendors to obtain prices for specific trades that you require.

Our dedicated Control List team will meticulously follow up on these RFQ’s to assist in obtaining the necessary responses.

By using the following tips, the responses you receive from vendors could be improved:

  • Provide vendors with drawings and/or specifications of the project.
  • Should a vendor contact you with regards to the quotation, assist as much as you are able to at the time.
  • Confirm that you are sending the RFQ to the correct vendor i.e read the description of the company, which will give you the necessary insight on their scope of works.
  • Keep an open line of communication, as good communication will assist with dealing with the same vendor in the future. For example; if the tender has been awarded, notify the vendor if you have been awarded the tender or not. This will let the vendor know that he/she is not pricing in vain.
  • Give the vendors sufficient time to respond to the RFQ (at least 5 – 7 days).

Hopefully, using these few tips, it will assist in an even smoother process to obtain your responses from various vendors, without being bombarded by unnecessary responses that you don’t need.

Feel free to give us a call if you require more information about our Leads 2 Quotes package on +27(0)860 836 337.

 

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About Nadine Vermeulen

I started working at Leads 2 Business in October 2014 in the Leads 2 Quotes Department. I managed all the Daily Tender Bill Requests and followed up on BoQ's for our Daily Tender Subscribers. In 2017, I was promoted to L2Q Assistant and now work with Bill of Quantities for Contractors. 🙂

Create a Tender that gets Results

Create a Tender that gets Results

In the world of construction, we often hear the word “tender” being used more often than ever…”Who was that tender awarded too?”, “X & Y have just put out a tender for the building of A”, “I wonder which company got awarded that tender?”…the big question then becomes, what is a Tender?

A tender is a process where an offer is put out to do work or supply a service/goods at a fixed price. Usually given by government and financial institutions they invite bids for large projects and have to be submitted in a finite deadline.

Creating a tender that will get the desired results may seem rather impossible but the reality is its all dependant on a few but relevant pointers will have a look at below:

  • Ensure that you are registered on the supplier database – find a sector that works for your line of business and register to be informed of the tenders that would be published.
  • Attend the briefing sessions so you would know what’s expected for the project.
  • Have the correct documents – it’s standard to have the correct documents as a company. Have a valid and current tax clearance and BEE certificate.
  • Have a good banking record, credit history and relationship with your clients and suppliers.
  • You must have the cash flow and necessary resources to bid for the tender.
  • Price in a competitive manner with proof – avoid pricing extremely low, get the pricing just correct.
  • Provide references – this will assist in boosting your chances of being awarded
  • Source out partnership – completing a project without assistance is always a bonus but it always helps to get assistance if needed.
  • Keep note of the of the closing date and submit before that time.
  • Keep a copy of your tender documents
  • Never give up – the tendering world isn’t easy at all but just because you didn’t get the first doesn’t mean the ones to follow won’t be a success.

Do remember that tenders are a lengthy process which may take a while before they are awarded, this doesn’t mean you should just bid for one and sit back waiting for the work..put in the effort and do as much research as you can in order to create a tender that will get you the results you desire.

It’s not so much that it is a difficult task but it needs you to be specific and pay close attention to the finer detail.

 

Sources

News24
Entrepreneurmag
Investopedia
GoogleImages
GoogleImages
GoogleImages

 

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Demolition Techniques

Demolition Techniques
You may assume demolition is simply blowing things up. Some involve explosions but it is however way more technical than that. There are various demolition techniques that are considered as ‘demolition’.

 

It must be noted that before any demolition takes place the following practices need to be completed according to The Constructor

1. Surveying
2. Removal of hazardous materials
3. Preparation of plan
4. Safety measures

 

Taking the above into account the following (according to Civil Engineering News) are selected.

1. Non Engineering Demolition also known as Manual.

a) Refering to tools such as Sledge Hammers, Jack Hammers and Drillers which are used by workers.

Jackhammer - Demolition Techniques.jpg
Jackhammer Technique

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Engineering Demolition which is split into 3 categories.

a) Mechanical Method:

Wrecking Ball (think Miley Cyrus but without the theatrics)

Pusher Arm technique (a specialised hydraulic arm used for smaller buildings)

Thermic Lance Technique (using flaming temperatures of 2500 0C to melt reinforcement)

Non-Explosive (drilling and filling with expanding slurry)

Concrete Sawing

Deliberate Collapse (significant structural items are removed)

Pressure Jetting (thanks to H20)

 

b) Implosion: Inward disintegration using explosives

c) Deconstruction: Non-structural and structural

Wrecking Ball - Demolition Techniques.jpg
Wrecking Ball Technique

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demolition encompasses many techniques and is often used in conjunction with new construction or renovation.

In conclusion, I’ll take inspiration from Rumi, ‘In this life many demolitions are actually renovations.’

 

If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit Leads 2 Business for more information on demolition tenders.
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About Sasha Anderson

I enjoy making new professional acquaintances and corresponding with existing clients. Reach out if you want to talk, L2B, social media, construction, technology, shoes, dachshunds, popular culture or travel.

The key role of Safety Officers

posted in: Construction Chat | 8

The key role of safety officers

Safety Officers and Their Functions:

Safety officer… Brrrrrr.… Just the mere words alone are enough to send cold shivers down any foreman’s spine.
This important professional can close down a construction site within an hour if proper safety and precaution measures are not adhered to.
They do, however, form probably the most vital part of the whole operation – And that is ensuring the safety of all personnel on site.

We all know how quickly and easily accidents can happen, especially on a dangerous construction site, where accidents are almost inevitable. These officers detailed, pedantic and precautionary planning is an essential part of ensuring the safety of everyone involved in the project.

 

Not to mention the financial losses that are incurred with the insurance claims which lead to more financial losses caused by delays and it just grows exponentially worse from there.

 

Reputations can be tested and destroyed, and the hardest hitting reality of it all…

People can die!

Remember the bridge that fell down over Grayston Drive in Sandton, Johannesburg, not that long ago? The first point of contact for the investigation was the Safety Officer!

Not sticking to the safety regulations is simply a lose-lose situation.

OK, now that I have scared everyone and put you all in a sombre mood, let’s get serious and highlight just some of the important functions of a Safety Officer.

1. Creating and Implementing Safety Policies:
The Safety Officer with the assistance of managers and construction workers determine what policies are needed to help employers reduce the accident-related costs and prevent losses
due to any decline in productivity. They then finalize these policies and are responsible for alerting workers about any changes and monitoring of compliance.

2. Workplace Inspections:
Safety Officers are responsible for inspecting the interior and exterior work areas to determine if there are any safety hazards. In these inspections, they look for any broken equipment, damaged or unstable equipment, slip-and-fall hazards and any other potential hazards. They also observe workers to ensure that the required personal protective equipment (PPE) is being worn and machinery is operated in the correct manner and that the employees themselves are adhering to the company’s safety policies.

3. Accident Investigations:
Should a workplace accident occur, a Safety Officer will conduct the investigation to determine why and how the accident happened. This includes questioning witnesses, accident site inspection and pictures may be taken of the scene for the comprehensive report he or she must write. They also then provide recommendations to prevent future accidents.

4. Training and Coaching:
Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide training on multitudes of safety topics, ranging from fire prevention plans, hazardous materials handling to machine operations. Safety Officers need to identify training needs, develop the correct programs and then deliver these programs to the employees.

5. Last, but not least… Regulatory Compliance:
These standards have already been put in place by OSHA and Occupational Safety Agencies, and are a necessity on construction sites. This involves reviewing these already set out standards, implementing plans to meet those standards and follow all of the correct record keeping procedures.

So as you can clearly see, these professionals play an integral part of keeping you and your workers safe.

Their job is your well-being!

 

 

 

Sources:
http://work.chron.com/duties-safety-officers-13515.html
https://www.aiha.org/get-involved/…/IPRWG-SafetyOfficerResponsibilities.doc
http://www.claybrick.org/what-are-duties-construction-health-safety-officer
https://resources.workable.com/safety-officer-job-description
http://fspbusiness.co.za/articles/hse-representatives/your-health-and-safety-officer-has-seven-essential-responsibilities-are-you-familiar-with-them-7081.html
https://www.thebalance.com/what-is-a-construction-safety-officer-844595

 

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About Nikki Blake

I am an Account Executive in our Gauteng branch. I have been with L2B for almost a year now and it has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. I am so passionate about people and being able to assist them grow their business with the use of our amazing system. It has not only given me an overwhelming sense of self fulfilment, but has also become my motivation to be the best person I can be each day. Thank you L2B and to all of our awesome clients!

L2B Blog: Fire Risks

Fire Risks


Since the early dawn of man, the discovery of fire has brought us progress in every way. A discovery that has pushed the human race beyond grunting and digging for roots, catapulting us into the future. It has provided us with warmth, transport, cooked meals and a living environment that is far more convenient and healthy.
Fire brings a risk of injury and/or death. The importance of treating fire with respect and a mental presence is pertinent to everyone’s wellbeing. This article will give you an overview of some of the risks that fire brings.

Fire requires three elements to start; heat, fuel & oxygen. Stupidity might be added as a fourth for a safe measure as this seems to be a common factor. Examples of fire hazards will include but are not limited to: objects generating heat, faulty electrical equipment, overloading of power supply sockets, smoking, human error and negligence as well as meteorological events (lightning).

 

Hoarding is considered to be one of the major contributors towards fire hazards. Hoarding is defined as the persisted collection and accumulation with an inability to relinquish a large number of objects. Hoarding might include variable objects and materials that humans collect and store causing clutter that will be the fuel for any fire. The rule of thumb is that if you haven’t used it for two months then get rid of it. It is not worth getting your mono-brow or ponytail singed by fire as a direct cause of your hoarding.

Whilst the list of materials posing possible fire risks is endless, the common list would include: flammable liquids of all kinds, gas, and fabric etc. It is of value to know the flash point of flammable material that you might utilise and or store on your premises.

The flashpoint of a volatile flammable material is the lowest temperature at which the vapours of the material will ignite when given an ignition source. The flash point is often confused with the autoignition temperature, which is the temperature at which the vapour ignites spontaneously on its own without an ignition source. The fire point is the lowest temperature at which the vapours of the material will continue to burn after being ignited and the ignition source has been removed. The fire point is higher than the flash point because at the flashpoint more vapour may not be produced rapidly enough to sustain combustion. Flammable materials almost always have a Material Safety Data Sheet that will include information in regards to the particular materials flash/ignition point. It is of value to take the time to read and familiarise yourself with this data if you are inclined to handle the material in an environment that could cause it to ignite.

 

 Whilst it is common knowledge as to the danger linked to well-known flammable materials, the risk of fire is hidden in materials that we do not commonly associate with fire. Ordinary cake flour is one of these products. In its original solid form, it has no risk of ignition. However, when converted into a fine dust, the risk of ignition increases exponentially. Other organic materials that fall into this category will include but are not limited to: grain, starch, sugar, powdered milk, cocoa, coffee, and pollen.

Fireball spreads rapidly:
A cloud of flour is ignited:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, if waking up from a “Rip Van Winkle” coma with your favourite little dog named “Skippy” imprinted as a vague Bushman drawing on your kitchen wall doesn’t appeal to you, then rather don’t celebrate your perfect ginger-bread man biscuits by applauding yourself with a hand full of flour over your ignited gas stove.

Be aware and educate yourself on all aspects of fire.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_explosion
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_point

Examples of Fire Hazards in the Workplace

 

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About Richard Venter

I joined the property division as the Financial Manager in 2017 and oversee the management and investment aspects of all properties owned.

L2B Blog: History of Hard Hats

.History of Hard Hats

History of Hard Hats

Hard Hats; a common symbol of the Construction Industry, but have you ever stopped to wonder about the History behind this safety accessory?

History

According to Prescot Valley Tribune, “The Hard Hat originated with Edward Bullard, a WWI veteran. He brought a steel helmet home after the war. This metal headgear was the inspiration to revolutionize industrial safety. Bullard’s father worked in the industrial safety business for 20 years and sold protective hats, but they were made of leather.

Construction of the Hoover Dam, which began in 1931 was the first project in which construction workers were required to wear Hard Hats. Later, in 1933, the construction site of the Golden Gate Bridge became America’s first “Hard Hat Area”.”

The first Hard Hats were made from:

  • Leather
  • Canvas
  • Steel
  • Aluminum
  • Fibreglass
  • Plastic
  • and finally today’s High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE).
Functionality

The function of the Hard Hat is pretty obvious. If worn and fitted correctly it provides limited safety from shock, perforation, fire, water and heat.

Hard Hats also provide a form of identification.

A wearer can use colour coded Hard Hats to differentiate between job titles/responsibilities:

  • White – Managers, Engineers, Supervisors/Foremen
  • Blue – Electricians, Carpenters and other technical operators (besides civil workers)
  • Green – Safety Officers
  • Red – Fire Fighters
  • Yellow – Labourers
  • Brown – Welders and workers with high heat application
  • Grey – Site Visitors

These colour codes are general and could change according to the Project.

Over time Hard Hats, like most things also need replacing. As a wearer, you should inspect your Hard Hats before each use.  Your support strap should also be replaced annually and the entire hat every five years. Hard Hats may also allow for the attachment of safety accessories; most noteworthy are face shields, respirators, hearing protection and work lamps.

Future

Today’s Hard Hat hasn’t changed much since the 1960’s and has become a staple of safety, but they may be getting an upgrade in the future.

According to Sourceable, “In Australia, RMIT has developed a system whereby sensors can be embedded onto safety glasses, helmets or boots and can monitor and inform workers of impending danger…”
Sounds really interesting, after all, technology is a part of our every day lives and why not safety too.
Industry leaders can achieve much by ‘upgrading’ the Hard Hat. For example, by monitoring and assessing stats you can take precautions; not only in the present but also in the future through behavior analysis. But this may also present issues; like how much monitoring is too much when it comes to privacy and tracking? What are your thoughts?

In conclusion, the future sure looks safe when it comes to Hard Hats. The History of Hard Hats was certainly an interesting topic to research and blog.

Finally

Do you have any Hard Hat stories or facts you’d like to share? Or do you frequently use one?

Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_hat

https://www.pvtrib.com/news/2018/jan/26/ask-contractor-history-hat-protects-workers/

https://www.thenbs.com/knowledge/what-colours-are-safety-helmets-hard-hats-on-construction-sites

http://www.civilology.com/helmet-color-code-construction/

https://sourceable.net/smart-hard-hats-next-trend-construction-safety/

 

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About Sasha Anderson

I enjoy making new professional acquaintances and corresponding with existing clients. Reach out if you want to talk, L2B, social media, construction, technology, shoes, dachshunds, popular culture or travel.

L2B Blog: The Most Important Tender / Project of your Career

The Most Important Tender / Project of your Career

The Most Important Tender/ Project of your Career

This can be up to interpretation. The most important tender or project could very well be your first tender or project. Being given the responsibility and trusted to compile a project or submit a tender on your own, can be a huge turning point in any career. Regardless of whether it’s a huge failure or a blazing success, the odds are that the lessons you learnt when working on your first are the lessons you carry with you for the rest of your career, and hopefully serve you in good stead.

“It’s fine to celebrate success, but more important to heed the lessons of failure.” — Bill Gates

The argument can be made for the most successful tender or project, being the turning point of a person’s career. It could be a tender or project that’s unique or innovative, and gets the attention of those in your industry or captures the public imagination. Success is measured in many ways and can come in just as many incarnations. The pat-on-the-back job that steers you towards grander goals, can be a stroke of luck or the product of unrelenting perseverance. The stress and pressure of such an endeavour can make or break you. And like all things in life, your attitude towards the success defines the lasting effect of it.

“Don’t aim for perfection. Aim for success.” — Eike Batiste

The most important tender or project could be the one that saves you. Many industries are increasingly under pressure, competitive and quite ruthless. Not all companies survive or go from strength to strength without there being periods of grasping desperation. Whether it’s the new start up or an established company battling to adapt to the changing times; that tender or project could be a lifeline that saves dreams, jobs and spirits. As long as you’re paid within 30 days, right? The most important might be the opportunity to keep hope alive and to carry on.

“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right.”  — Henry Ford

The lucky dodge. Hell, perhaps you were passed over with regards to a particular tender or project. Perhaps you wanted it really badly and you had worked your butt off to get to be part of the team, and you were left out. Not all tender or project teams are good or experienced. Or honest. Or share your work ethic. It might be that it all looked perfect like the stars aligned and then life happened. There are many horror stories out there, with buildings falling down or the word “collusion” being thrown around. A natural disaster or a bad turn in the economy. Does anyone really want to be associated with any of that when it all hits the fan? Dodging the bullet is the lucky break no one wants at the time, but is thankful for when it all comes to light. Unfortunately, in society people are tainted by association. It’s unfair, but unwaveringly true. “Be careful what you wish for” – the most important tender or project of your career might be the one that does not appear on your resume.

“It’s better to hang out with people better than you. Pick out associates whose behaviour is better than yours and you’ll drift in that direction.” — Warren Buffett

The one you missed, can define your career. The focus might be on the successes, the big payday or the photo opportunities when breaking ground or cutting the opening day ribbon; but none of that compares to the quiet of the missed chance. If you fail; you know. If you succeed; you know. But if you don’t even get a chance to try; you’ll never know. Not to be dramatic, or anything but being in the loop, and knowing what and when is vital for there to be any chance at landing that big payday or that career-defining project. Information is power. The importance of this is not lost on us and is our bread and butter. Get in the know early, and you can reap the reward later.

“The most meaningful way to differentiate your company from your competitors, the best way to put distance between you and the crowd is to do an outstanding job with information. How you gather, manage and use information will determine whether you win or lose.” — Bill Gates

So whether it’s the first go, the shining success story, the dodged bullet or the missed chance; hopefully these all form part of long and enduring careers, with just a few colourful stories to tell.

What do you consider your most important tender or project? Leave a comment below.

 

Source:

https://foundr.com/50-billionaire-tips/

 

L2B Blog: How to make the most of our Tender Leads

Did you Know #DYK – How to search for trending civil tenders?

 

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About Claire Donaldson

I started working at Leads 2 Business in February 2005, and have served as Head of Department of Daily Tenders from 2007 until the present. I oversee both the Daily Tenders South Africa and Africa Departments.

L2B Blog: CIDB Grading (How it works)

CIDB Grading (How it works)

CIDB Grading (How it works)

 

Today, I will be chatting about CIDB and how it works. Yes, I know…CIDB, what? Let me assure you that when I first started at Leads 2 Business I had no clue what CIDB was, what it stood for or how it even worked. Rest assured though, I will go slow.

 

Definition: CIDB

Construction Industry Development Board. Big words, I know, but all it means Construction companies that are required to be registered to CIDB for numerous types of construction work. That is correct. So if you are an owner of a Construction Company and you are applying for tenders, you need to be registered under the Construction Industry Development Board in order to qualify for the necessary requirements for a tender.

 

Many times in the Construction Industry, when Municipalities are advertising tenders, one of the requirements are being registered under CIDB.

Alright, now that we know what CIDB is, let us have a look at the CIDB Class of Construction works that fall under CIDB. There are about twenty different Classes of Construction Works. Do not worry…I will not bore you with all the details. I am simply going to list them:

Class of Construction Works:
  1. GB – General Building
  2. CE – Civil Engineering
  3. EB – Electrical Engineering Works – Building
  4. EP – Electrical Engineering Works – Infrastructure
  5. ME – Mechanical Engineering
  6. SB – Asphalt Works (Supply and Lay)
  7. SC – Building Excavations, shaft sinking, lateral earth ear support
  8. SD – Corrosion Protection (cathodic, anodic and electrolytic)
  9. SE – Demolition and Blasting
  10. SF – Fire prevention and Protective systems
  11. SG – Glazing, curtain walls and shoplifts
  12. SH – Landscaping, irrigation and horticulture works
  13. SI – Lifts, escalators and travellators (installation, commissioning and maintenance)
  14. SJ – Piling and Specialised foundations for buildings and structures
  15. SK – Road marking and signage
  16. SL – Structural steelwork fabrication and erection
  17. SM – Timber buildings and structures
  18. SN – Waterproofing of basements, roofs and walls using specialised systems
  19. SO – Water Supply and drainage for building (wet services, plumbing)
  20. SQ – Steel security fencing or precast concrete

 

Now we are going to take a look at the Values of the Rating for CIDB gradings.

Here they are:

CIDB 1: R 0 – R 200.000

CIDB 2: R 200.00 – R 650.00

CIDB 3: R650.00 – R 2 Million

CIDB 4: R 2 Million – R 4 Million

CIDB 5: R 4 Million – R 6.5 Million

CIDB 6: R 6.5 Million – R 13 Million

CIDB 7: R 13 Million – R 40 Million

CIDB 8: R 40 Million – R 130 Million

CIDB 9: R130 Million Plus

Okay, that was quite a mouthful. The Class of Construction works is basically an indication of what your business does.

Now we will take a look at how your company determines their grading. This is called the Grading Designation Calculator and can be done on the CIDB Website. All that is required of your business is the financial documents. Well, you are looking at your Profit and Loss for the Financial Year, the largest contract value that was awarded to your company and you will also need the capital value of the business.

Below is an example of a how a Grading Designartion Calculator is done. Trust me, it really simple and just takes a few minutes:

 

 

Please note that the CIDB is only for Construction Companies that do Construction work for non–residential areas. That would be your Office Buildings, General Building and Maintenace of government property (Hospitals, Fire Stations, Municipal Buildings, etc).

Construction companies that deal with Residential areas, your company has to be registered under the National Home Building Council (NHBRC). The NHBRC is very different from CIDB in the sense that, the Construction Company has to prove to the NHBRC the number of houses they have built to date.

To register on CIDB, it is very simple. All you need to do is submit an application and select the applicable Grade. The construction company also needs to indicate the maximum value of work permissible in their registered grading level. There are different requirements for track record and financial capability depending on the grades and classes. The application criteria need to meet both the requirements in order to satisfy the grading assessment criteria. The CIDB Provincial Offices offer free help desk support to contractors.

The application only takes 21 working days to be registered. The 21 day waiting period is the turnaround time for applications that are complete and compliant with the requirements of the grade the contractor is applying for. Grade 1 applicants only take 48 hours to be processed and for registration to reflect on CIDB. Once the 21 working days have passed and the contractor is compliant, the contractor is then registered on the CIDB website and now have access to tender opportunities that are in their CIDB grading. In order to register you can go to the CIDB Website:

 

Note: Your registration expires after 3 years

 

CIDB also publishes tenders that have been awarded on the system. That would mean if a contractor has applied for a specific tender, and once that tender has been awarded, one of the first places it gets published is on the CIDB website. Here, the name of the Awarded Company has listed as well as the contract value and the contract period. Below is an example of what the Award Information looks like:

 

 

Alright, so that concludes my discussion for the day. I must admit that it was quite fun sharing my information with you today. I can only hope that somewhere out there, a subscriber has learned something new today, I know I did.

 

Sources:

http://registers.cidb.org.za/PublicContractors/GradingDesignationCalc

http://registers.cidb.org.za/PublicTenders/TenderSearch

http://www.cidb.org.za/publications/Pages/Application-Forms.aspx

 

 

If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.

To view notes with screenshots on how to use our website, please visit our Wiki site.

To view more articles, please visit our blog.

 

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About Lauren Davids

I am a Content Researcher for the Western Cape Region in the Tenders South Africa Department.

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