Featured Tender: Provision of Consulting Engineering Services

Featured Tender: Northern Cape

Contract Number:

N.008-080-2020/2F – The South African National Roads Agency Limited

Description:

Tender are invited to bid on the provision of Consulting Engineering Services for the Periodic Maintenance of National Route 8 Section 8 between Sinovel (km 20.0) and Zandplaats (km 40.0). This project is in the province of Northern Cape and in the district municipality/local municipality of Sol Plaatje and the approximate programme is for design and construction documentation to be completed by April 2021 followed by supervision of 8 months, commencing 1 September 2021.

Category Industry
Consultants Institutional, Road
Region Site Inspection
Northern Cape Briefing Session: There is no clarification meeting for this tender. A tenderer’s clarification presentation is available to be downloaded from the SANRAL website by the following link: https://www.nra.co.za/service-provider-zone/tenders/open-tenders/.Site Meeting(s): Not applicable.
Closing Date Contract Period
04 December 2020 at 11:00 No details.

 


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About Antonette Claassens

I am a fanatical researcher who takes immense pride in the information I publish and those all-important finer details. When I'm not "researching up a storm", I love the ocean, fab music, and fine dining.

Tunnel Boring Machines

Tunnel Boring Machines (TBM)

A tunnel boring machine (TBM), also known as a “mole”, is a very large machine designed to excavate and drill with a circular cross-section, through a variety of soils and rock to create a tunnel.
Tunnel boring machines are used as an alternative to drilling and blasting methods in rock and conventional “hand mining” in soil. TBMs have the advantages of limiting the disturbance to the surrounding ground and producing a smooth tunnel wall. This significantly reduces the cost of lining the tunnel and makes them suitable to use in heavily urbanized areas. The major disadvantage is the upfront cost. TBMs are expensive to construct and can be difficult to transport, due to their very large size.
The first tunnelling machine was designed by an Engineer, Marc Brunel in the 19th century. It was used to help build the Thames tunnel in 1843 – the first tunnel under a river. Brunel’s invention was basically just an iron framework with spaces for workmen to stand-in. Tunnellers dug out the earth in front of them with pickaxes and shovels.
According to global tunnelling tradition, a TBM cannot start work until it is given a name. This tradition also sees most TBMs being named after women. Why are they given women’s names? Apparently, it’s a tradition dating back to the 1500s when miners and anyone working underground with explosives prayed to Saint Barbara to protect them from the dangers underground.
Phyllis, Ada, Elizabeth, Victoria, Jessica, Ellie, Sophia and Mary were the names of the eight tunnel boring machines used in London’s mega Cross-rail Project. Big Bertha is the infamous TBM stuck underneath Seattle and Alice tunnelled Vancouver’s new Evergreen Line.
Here in South Africa, the R300 million TMB used to construct the 3-kilometre tunnel stretching from Rosebank Station to Park Station as part of the Gautrain project in Gauteng was named ‘Imbokodo’, or ‘hard rock’. The name, ‘Imbokodo’, flows from the women’s protest march to the Union Buildings on August 9, 1956. This march saw the birth of the phrase ‘wathinta abafazi, wathinta imbokodo’ or, ‘if you strike a woman, you strike a rock’. Project officials chose the name because they believed the TBM would do her work with the “agility and effect of a super kung fu master, yet with a feminine touch of tenderness and softness as she tunnels her way through soft ground and hard rock”.

The world’s largest hard rock TBM is known as Martina, (she has an excavation diameter of 15.62m, a total length of 130m and a total weight of 4,500 tons. It was built by Herrenknecht AG, and is owned and operated an Italian construction company, Toto S.p.A. Costruzioni Generali (Toto Group) and was used for the tunnelling of the Sparvo gallery of the Italian Motorway Pass A1 near Florence in Italy.
Tunnelling machines have had an economic, environmental and cultural effect around the world. Like bridges, tunnels connecting communities, and sometimes even entire nations!
In the UK for example, modern TBMs have helped boost the economy. London Underground’s Jubilee line tunnel has brought redevelopment all along the new line.
TBMs can also be used to improve the environment. The machines that dug the Lee and Thames Tideway tunnels helped improve sewage treatment for large areas of London.
Today’s modern tunnelling machines look very different from Marc Brunel’s miner’s cage, but their function is very similar. The TBMs dig out earth which is carried back behind it – usually on a conveyor belt. The TBM moves forward and continues to dig.

Showing a TBM in action, underground

“Like giant underground factories on rails, they’re the equivalent of 14 London buses end-to-end and a staggering 143 buses in weight”

 

Sources:
Mining
Engineering News
ICE


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About Marlaine Andersen

I have been working for Leads 2 Business, in the Private Projects Department, for 10 years this July. I am Deputy HoD for Private Projects. Researching mining projects and projects through-out the African continent are my areas of research and I find them most interesting.

Featured Project: The Palms – Building

Northern Cape

Description
Construction of a residential complex in the heart of Kimberley in the Northern Cape. The development will be known as The Palms and will consist of an entertainment area and a total of 327 units, varying in sizes and levels up to 3 storeys.

 

Status Region
Underway Kimberley
Category Value
Building R 100 million+
Industry Timing
Residential 2013 onwards
Sector Class
Private Invited / Negotiated

 


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About Sonet van Wygaard

I started working at Leads 2 Business in 2014. I was part of the Tenders Africa team and have now recently moved to Private Projects. I love every second of it!

OPINION: SA Construction Industry during COVID-19

posted in: General 0

An opinion piece on Construction in South Africa during Covid

26 March 2020, the day that everything changed. Hard lock-down. The entire country sequestered to their homes and not permitted to leave, it was called Lock-down Level 5. The ramifications of this decision will still be felt by everyone in all industries and walks of life for a long long time. We were entering the unknown, fearful of everything and everyone and if you listened to the various news broadcasters masquerading as prophets of doom and gloom, the world as we knew it had come to end, normal did not exist any more and life would never ever be the same again. I eventually made the conscious decision to change the TV channel from any and all news broadcasts and limited myself to one broadcast of news per day, this was for my own sanity as the bombarding of constant fear-mongering was powerfully eroding away at me. But this unknown scary time was going to be for 21 days, I would survive. Oh, how little did I know…..

But not all was doom and gloom, I was going to work remotely. I had subscribers that were depending on me to obtain information that was not readily available, they needed this information to assist in their business, they needed to keep their business going which in turn keeps our business going, it seems like an endless circle, but actually makes sense. Gosh, information was very scarce initially, no one knew what was happening (and if they did they did not want to say anything because who knew what tomorrow would bring…) Town planning and environmental notices (where we get a lot of our very new projects) “dried up” and no new notices were being posted, new tenders being published dwindled down to almost nothing, in fact, I noted that most of the tenders that were still going out were for various Eskom entities that needed repairs, Eskom’s procurement department was still hard at work. It was very slow going in the beginning, could not contact professionals, some were on leave, some did not have mobile numbers.

21 days came and went and lock-down continued. Come 1 May 2020 and the country moved down to level 4, this meant a slightly different set of rules, we still could not leave our homes unless it was an essential service, but we could exercise within a 5km radius of our homes between 6am and 9am. It was still dark at 6am and dangerous to leave your home but that didn’t worry me, I am not an exercise person anyway! But I digress, back to work….looks like some construction could start again, essential infrastructure projects and repairs but still the tenders had not really picked up as most of the municipalities remain closed, and they are the ones that put out the tenders according to their budgets…. Great excitement….we are moving to level 3 on 1 June 2020..hooray…many more sectors can open up and construction will definitely pick up now, slowly and surely tenders starting picking up and there was much speculation about all the field hospitals that were being planned (these projects were shrouded in secrecy and very little information was being released) but we persevered and were diligent in our research and managed to add 13 of these Covid 19 hospital projects to our database. Half of the office was still working remotely and the other half were coming to the office under strict hygiene and sanitising conditions. The joy of sitting at my desk, with the familiar all around me was soothing to the soul, maybe, just maybe things are going to be okay, no wait, I know they going to be okay, it might be different, it might be hard but it will be okay. I felt the construction industry was starting to look up and gain a little traction, majority of the projects in various sectors that were under construction when the lock-down was announced were prepping their sites and educating their staff on how to take precautions so that construction could recommence in earnest. Our L2Q department started getting new bills from contractors that required coding and pricing, there was a definite movement in the industry.

Level 2 was the next stage and that momentous day was 18 August 2020, 145 days since the National Lock-down was implemented. Additional industries have been permitted to start again and the number of tenders has increased, in all the different trades that we capture. Even though life might not be the same and the old normal has evolved into a new normal with a face mask and copious amount of sanitiser, there are signs of the Private Construction Sector is moving ahead and the larger privately funded projects are being awarded and construction is starting, new developments are being marketed and researching for updated information is moving at an increased pace.

We entered Level 1 on 21 September 2020 and there has been a substantial increase in public tenders as well as the progress and movement in privately funded projects.

Even though the effects on the construction industry and economy in the whole will likely have long term consequences Leads 2 Business will strive to continue sourcing viable and beneficial information for our subscribers as we did through the entire lock-down.


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About Debbie Wessels

Juggling a energetic, full of surprises life, working full time with two teenagers and hoping to still be sane and normal by the time I retire.

5 Essential Tools used in Construction

When I was first given this topic, my mind went straight to the larger tools such as concrete mixers, scaffolding, etc but why do we always need to think big, what about the basic tools, not even the powered tools, let’s get back to the basics.

After giving it some thought, I realized that 5 essential tools would be different for everyone, as no two constructors are the same, and it would all depend on what one specializes in and of course what they deem useful to them


So from an office worker, here’s my take on the five most essential tools to have in one’s tool belt if you are in construction:

 

  1. Tape measure, as the saying goes measure twice, cut once. Everything in construction needs to be measured, no matter what field you are in.
  2. Pencil/chalk – once measured, the measurement needs to be marked off, drawings and designs need to be marked too.
  3. Hammer – what would a builder be without a hammer especially one with a claw. So many things one can do with a hammer!.
  4. Stanley knife – such a handy tool, one can cut tape, rubber, electrical wire, etc. Strip the end of the wire and so much more.
  5. Pliers – a good quality pair of pliers is vital to hold, pull and cut building materials.

 

This is my take but I am sure that many will find that other items are more essential or important to them.
Happy Constructing:)


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About Debora Keet

My journey at Leads 2 Business started in January 2006 as a Private Projects Researcher, Since October 2008, I have been in the Administration and Human Resources department.

OPINION: SA’s construction sector is in ICU. Here’s how government can help

Like most sectors of the economy, the South African construction sector has been struggling prior to the lockdown instituted by government in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. This restriction on almost of all projects further pushed already struggling construction companies down the cliff.

All comes against the backdrop of well-known industry issues such as declining government infrastructure spend poor payment practices within sector’s supply chains and more importantly, the broken industry operating model that is no longer fit for purpose.

This declining trend in public infrastructure spend is largely due to municipalities and state-owned companies substantially reducing their spending over the past few years. Transnet, Eskom and several major state-owned companies have struggled to access capital markets to finance capital projects and infrastructure programmes.

Most municipalities have been consistently underspending on conditional infrastructure grants and are they are not collecting enough revenues to finance their capital budgets. The same trend is visible in infrastructure spending as a percentage of GDP. Government can change this.

For instance, without even lifting a finger, the government can consider practical and actionable strategies already presented and tabled by the industry.

In response to Covid-19, the construction sector has since formed a Construction Sector Covid-19 Task Team, currently comprised of over 30 organisations representing major suppliers, contractors, regulators, professional associations and built environment professional services firms. This Task Team has since worked with government to develop an industry-specific Covid-19 Construction Health & Safety Protocol. Furthermore, the Task Team has submitted a comprehensive short to medium term plan government of actionable reforms to help the sector recover.

This initiative shows that the construction sector is already working together to respond to the impact of the Covid-19 and ensure sustainability of the industry over the coming weeks and months, as well as to enable it to play a full part in South Africa’s economic recovery as the global search for vaccine progresses.

However, the sector also needs support and a clear commitment from government expedite various infrastructure policy reforms.

1. A predictable and reliable long-term infrastructure pipeline

A forward-looking pipeline of planned projects and programmes of economic and social infrastructure is urgently required to help construction companies understand which infrastructure investments government is currently prioritising. By publishing the pipeline, the government will help provide visibility, knowledge and understanding of where infrastructure investment is being made and by whom. Publishing projections of longer-term infrastructure investment will boost market confidence and will help the sector with business planning. This is important because the 18 Strategic Infrastructure Projects (SIPs) which were coordinated by the Presidential Coordinating Infrastructure Commission established during the Zuma administration lacked transparency and to this day no one has a clue about their progress. The recent announcement that the Presidency will host the inaugural Sustainable Infrastructure Development Symposium is a step in the right direction.

2. A single government body to coordinate infrastructure planning

The government should establish under the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure an infrastructure planning and coordinating body that will combine fragmented efforts and infrastructure related work currently done in different government departments. The Budget Facility for Infrastructure within Treasury, the GTAC Capital Projects Unit, the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission within Trade, Industry and Economic Development, the Public-Private Partnerships Unit within Treasury and ultimately the newly established Presidential Office for Investment and Infrastructure led by Dr.Kgosientsho Ramokgopa should all be merged into a single entity will coordinate all infrastructure planning and coordinating efforts of national, provincial, local government and major state-owned enterprises. This has obvious benefits for the sector. The current level of fragmentation is problematic and wasteful. The lack of transparency by DBSA on the R100bn Infrastructure Fund is also concerning.

3. The use of innovative infrastructure procurement delivery methods

Government should also commit to moving away from the unsustainable transactional and cost-driven procurement of infrastructure and instead embrace the creation of value-driven, collaborative procurement methods that can deliver investment programmes that secure the outcomes demanded by clients and the public. The use of alliance contracting, integrated project delivery and design-build procurement could help address the gaps and failures presented by the current traditional construction procurement delivery approach.

The myth that lowest cost equals best value only survives because of the lack of best value options to compare it with. Furthermore, the processes of designing infrastructure, obtaining tenders, administering contracts and dealing with claims all incur transaction costs, management costs and overheads down the supply chain. These costs are embedded in every price submitted by tenderers and in the final price paid by the owner. The construction industry shows little interest in measuring these costs in a consistent manner and this lack of transparency. Government can change this.

South Africa needs high performing infrastructure. Without it we have little hope of improving the productivity of our economy. Without an improvement in productivity, we will not be able to secure the quality of life demanded by our growing population. Yet the model we use to deliver and operate much of our infrastructure is broken. Too often it produces assets and networks that are expensive, perform poorly and fail to exploit the advances in technology that are transforming other industries. Too often the supply chain that delivers our infrastructure seems locked into a cycle of low margins, low investment and dysfunctional relationships. Covid-19 has presented our government with an opportunity to change this.

By Mr, Ronnie Siphika is the Chief Executive at Construction Management Foundation and member in the Construction Sector Covid-19 Rapid Response Task Team.

Source


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About Sasha Anderson

Millennial Mom + wife living the hash-tag life

Abandoned Construction Projects in Africa

posted in: Construction Chat 0

An abandoned construction project can be defined as a project which has been 1) totally abandoned, or 2) indefinitely delayed. Abandonment may happen at any stage of a project life-cycle and incur a significant amount of loss.

There are various reasons why construction projects are abandoned:

  • Inadequate planning
  • Inadequate finance
  • Inflation
  • Bankruptcy of Contractor
  • Variation of project scope
  • Political factor
  • Delaying in payment
  • Incompetent project manager
  • Wrong estimate
  • Faulty design
  • Inadequate cost control
  • Change of priority
  • Unqualified/inexperience Consultants
  • Administrative/legal action
  • Disputes
  • Natural Disasters

The effects of construction projects are mainly:

  • Unemployment
  • Bad image for government
  • Government sector underdevelopment
  • Slow economic growth
  • Financial institutions lose confidence in the state
  • Discourages investment
  • Loss of revenue by state

Here are a few construction projects that have been abandoned and the reasons:

1. The Ghana-STX Building Project, a $10 billion housing project – The project was supposed to lead to the construction of 200,000 houses in Ghana for over 5 years. From research findings, causes of failure of the project were due mostly to disunity, lack of effective governance and project control. Corruption was also a feature.

2.  Mususu Kalenga Building in Zambia – The structure was built at a cost of K400 million by the Zambia State Insurance Corporation and sold to Royal Lutanda Company Limited at K800 million in 2000. The 11-storey building has remained abandoned for over 25 years. There is no indication as to why it was never completed.


3.    900-1000MW Coal Power Plant at Lamu in Lamu County, Kenya – Kenya’s National Environment Tribunal revoked the license granted to the Power Company to build a coal power plant, due to the companies failure to do a thorough environment and social impact assessment (ESIA) that met the requirements of the law.

4.    Construction of a 20,000 seat capacity stadium in Mongu District in Zambia – The government abandoned its plans for the Mongu Stadium most likely due to lack of funding.

5.    Grand Police Bay Hotel, Seychelles – There was a lot of backlash regarding this project and the government decided to not proceed with its plans.

6.    Al-Noor Tower, Casablanca, Morocco – The 540m high skyscraper was to include a luxury hotel,  offices, apartments, an art gallery and a luxury arcade of shops. The client, Middle East Development LLC decided to not proceed with the development stating that a tower if this size was not an appropriate project for Morocco at the moment.

7.    Hope City – A mixed-use development in Ghana – With a downturn in the economy, relocation of the project, and erratic power supply, work on the project never got underway. RLG Communications, the Ghanaian tech company which was supposed to be spearheading the project was itself caught up in various scandals. To date, nothing further has happened with this development.

8.    Pinewood Uranium Project, Tanzania – Kibo Mining (AIM: KIBO; AltX: KBO) announced on 24th February 2017 that it will cease activities at its Pinewood and Morogoro uranium coal and gold projects with immediate effect. The reason behind this strategic choice is in that both Metal Tiger and Kibo Mining have experienced considerable success in other projects of their business portfolio and this has led to these interests becoming the absolute focus of each company.

9.    Construction of sewers, roads and infrastructural services for 360 plots in Kazungula Village and at Nnyungwe area in Kasane, Botswana – Government mysteriously abandons the P80 Million tender as works near completion and this sparks corruption rumours.

Sources:
Research Gate – Abandoned
Research Gate – Government
PM World Library
The Gazette
L2B


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About Nadia Milln

My journey at Leads 2 Business all started back in September 2014 as a content researcher in the Daily Tenders Africa Department. In March 2018 I was promoted to content researcher in the Private Project department. I am a fun loving, bubbly person and mom to a beautiful baby boy who is the absolute light of my life.

Challenges Women Face in the Construction Industry

There has been a large number of studies done since the 19th century, highlighting the challenges women face in male-dominated industries. An even more alarming amount of research was undertaken after “female friendlier” 20th century. Research in the 20th century focused on challenges women in the construction industry face, whether it is in entering or remaining in the industry. It was interesting to note that even though these studies were undertaken independently of each other, there were a few common factors in all the papers that highlighted. These key papers and factors challenged the status quo and put to question other issues women deal with.

The factors I have identified in my research are presented in this blog with elaboration on each factor. The overall aim in putting together this blog was not to leave female readers feeling defeated but rather, I hope that it becomes a part of a narrative that encourages women in this sector to carry on holding it down and changing the outdated social behavioural norms this industry is built upon despite the hardships. Their time of existence is up!

Factors discussed include:

  • The image of the industry,
  • Career knowledge,
  • Culture and working environment,
  • Male-dominated training courses and
  • Family commitments.

The studies showed that the general image of the sector was a huge deciding factor for both men and women however, it presents more pressures to women. Studies found to illustrate the sector’s image as highly militant as it is a male-dominated sector requiring brute strength, good tolerance for outdoor conditions, inclement weather and bad language and experts have suggested that it is mainly this image that makes females uninterested in gaining entry in the sector.

To add fuel to the fire, the sector has also been infamously defined as being among the most chauvinistic with an extremely macho culture which is hostile and discriminatory to women. This often results in women having to act like men to be successful, or leave if they are not adaptable to the culture. Or they remain in the industry without behaving like men but then they maintain unimportant positions with no real power to make impactful decisions.

The academic training offered by institutions and training organizations create a host of problems for women where they are faced with general disbelief either while in school from the instructors or when they enter the working world from their colleagues that they could be technically competent. My findings also illustrated that women tend to lack access to informal networks that provide access to high-profile development opportunities. Furthermore, women have limited offers presented to them or limited access to a range of developmental experiences and activities that build the credibility they need to advance in this industry. I am uncertain though if the latter finding is due to the academic structures of the sector or the companies hiring these females just not being open to offering these opportunities to them.

And finally, the child-bearing problem, a never-ending issue for women with career aspirations in any sector. I did not need to do much research on this last factor as it touches a personal aspect of my life. The demands the construction industry places on personal relationships is tremendous and damaging. My father was a civil engineer, employed a director in the Department of Transport KZN. The constant site meetings, inspections and whatever else he had on his plate put a strain on our father-daughter bond. Simply put, he was never home and this is a reality for a lot of site-based employees, they are usually subject to the location needs and potential change. As a result, I moved around a lot as a kid and just working at Leads 2 Business and interacting with professionals daily-basis, I am sad to say that the industry is still failing to appreciate some of the issues associated with combining work and family commitments and because of the childbearing innate character in most females, finding a balance between work and family could be a huge factor that poses difficulties for women in the industry.

In closing, I will use the words by Zara Hadid, the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize, the architect-designer for the London Aquatics Centre for the Olympic Games.

It’s still very difficult for women to operate as professionals because there are still some worlds women have no access to. No matter what you do, because you’re a woman, you cannot enter. Sometimes the difficulties are incomprehensible. You cannot believe the enormous resistance I’ve faced just for being an Arab, and a woman on top of that. The moment my woman-ness is accepted, the Arab-ness seems to become a problem. I’ve broken beyond the barrier, but it’s been a very long struggle. It’s made me tougher and more precise – and maybe this is reflected in my work. I still experience resistance, but I think this keeps you on the go.”

I think that sums up the rewards of perseverance in the industry. Just keep going. It will pay off!

Sources:
B Constructive
Semantic Scholar
The Guardian
Building Professions, (University of Sussex: Institute for Employment Studies/CIOB)


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About Minnie Zondi

I am an insanely optimistic ambivert that does everything from the heart instead of the mind. Deeply interested in people and matters that pertain to mankind.

How Climate Change Affects Construction

Many parts of the country and all over the world are experiencing climate change. The weather changes are and will continue to have a prominent effect on the construction industry and the employment rates.

There are four concerns around climate change in terms of the greatest impact it will have on the construction industry:

  • Worker safety
  • Weather-related delays
  • Construction materials design and manufacturing
  • Insurance costs

Journey with me as we explore and investigate The Effects of Climate change on Construction.

Climate change is expected to have an impact on many aspects of building performance. The world’s climate is changing.

We leave little room for error on the construction site, especially if the error is beyond your control. Perhaps one of the most recent concerns is the effect that climate change is having on the construction industry.

According to sources, the global sea level has risen about eight inches in the last 100 years, with the rate in the past two decades nearly doubling, the number of record high temperature increasing, along with increasing numbers of intense rainfall.

With the weather becoming more aggressive and untimely, this can only mean destruction for an industry that relies on weather predictability and clear skies.

Climate change impacts worksite safety with unpredictable rain. Flooding can lead to deteriorating wood and slippery surfaces increasing injuries and high temperatures can cause heatstroke, heat exhaustion and could sadly lead to death. No matter what precautions are taken to protect workers in these harsh conditions, the biggest threat is unpredictability.

Climate change also has an effect on building materials and current structures. Changes in temperatures cause building materials like brick and wood to decay and crack faster.

Construction companies increasingly find themselves facing escalated insurance costs due to project delays, which are related to extreme weather and labour risks. This means construction companies need to increase the costs of the project to accommodate rising insurance costs or stop with certain construction projects due to an inability to afford insurance.

Buildings can be affected drastically by climate change, where in the future there may be the risk of collapse, health breakouts and loss of value as a result of heavy rainfall. Building lifetime is reduced, stronger storms are the greatest challenge and this is a continuous safety risk.

Research has shown that with implications for the future, climate change will have different impacts on different buildings depending on the type, scale, use, construction and location. It is clear that even without the current uncertainties in climate change, science and the potential impacts of climate change on buildings, establishing suitable mechanisms to deal with these issues is also problematic.

In conclusion, the upside of Climate Change, the one thing you can be sure of is that no matter what changes there may be, we at Leads 2 Business will be there to keep you updated.


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About Estelle Pillay

My start here at Leads 2 Business in April 2019 marks a journey so far vibrant and exciting. I function as a content researcher within a dynamic team in the Projects Department, on the other side I am a mother of two beautiful children who bring out the best part of me.

Industry Events: March 2020

Industry Events: March 2020

Event:

Africa Energy Indaba

Date:

3 to 4 March 2020

Event Location:

Cape Town International Convention Centre, South Africa

Event Description:

The Africa Energy Indaba Conference will discuss, debate and seek solutions to enable adequate energy generation across the continent. Delegates, drawn from all continents, represent an unrivalled combination of industry experts, project developers, financiers, energy users, government officials and manufacturers.

Contact Details:

Tel: +27 11 463 9184
Email: info@energyindaba.co.za

Event Details:
Website
Registration

 

Event:

Dubai Property Show

Date:

7 to 8 March 2020

Event Location:

The Maslow Time Square, Pretoria, South Africa

Event Description:

Dubai Property Expo is the concept which brought state of the art more than 100 projects with the flexible plan and promotional offers. The show brings some of the biggest names in property, behind some of the safest and most secure projects in Dubai. While the show is specifically aimed at making it easier for peoples to invest in Dubai, anyone who is looking to invest in Dubai should attend. The show brings some of the biggest names in property, behind some of the safest and most secure projects in Dubai. So whether you are looking to invest in commercial property or looking for something residential, this is the right place for you.

Contact Details:

Tel: +971 55 774 6715

Event Details:
Website

 

Event:

Water Africa & East Africa Building and Construction

Date:

11 to 13 March 2020

Event Location:

Kigali Serena Hotel, Kigali,Rwanda

Event Description:

The event will encompass an exhibition covering products and services related to the water, sanitation, building & construction sectors with a seminar programme running alongside tackling subjects which are relevant to these sectors, the Rwandan economy, its people and infrastructure. We ensure that exhibitors reach the key decision-makers from the Rwandan Ministries, contractors and consultants, engineers, architects, planners, suppliers, NGOs, investors and developers involved in both sectors. Exhibitors will be showing the latest equipment and services in the field of civil engineering construction, building for commercial and industrial use as well as social housing. Exhibitors are invited to take part in the accompanying seminar programmes, which will be run in co-ordination with the Rwandan Ministries.

Contact Details:

Tel: +44 (0)7743 686321
Email: info@ace-events.com

Event Details:
Website
Registration

 

Event:

Building Information Modeling Africa Conference

Date:

11 to 13 March 2020

Event Location:

Johannesburg, South Africa

Event Description:

The Building Information Modeling Conference brings the right people together to drive the digitisation of construction processes. This will increase the quality and efficiency of the African construction industry.

Contact Details:

Tel: +27 (0)21 556 9253
Email: info@millasa.co.za

Event Details:
Website
Registration

 

Event:

Decorex Durban

Date:

19 to 22 March 2020

Event Location:

11 Walnut Road, Durban, Durban Exhibition Centre, South Africa

Event Description:

his prestigious showcase of the latest products and trends from top designers, décor professionals and industry experts is always hotly anticipated – and the 2020 instalment will be even bigger and better than before!

Contact Details:

Tel: +27 11 549 8300
Email: decorexafrica@reedexpoafrica.co.za

Event Details:
Website
Registration

 


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About Sasha Anderson

Millennial Mom + wife living the hash-tag life

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