Featured Project: Olympic Stadium, Ivory Coast

Olympic Stadium, Ivory Coast
The Palms - Building

Description:

Construction of an 60 000 seater Olympic stadium in Abidjan in the Ivory Coast. The stadium is to be ready for the 2012 African Cup of Nations, which will be staged in Ivory Coast. While the stadium itself will cover 20 hectares, a vast Olympic village is planned around it, spanning across 287 hectares.

 

Olympic Stadium, Ivory Coast

Status:

Underway

Category:

Building

Industry:

Hospitality & Leisure

Sector:

Public Private Partnership

Region:

Ivory Coast

Value:

R 100 million+

Timing:

34 months

Class

Invited / Negotiated

 

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details about this Project here
If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.
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To view more articles, please visit our blog.

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Featured Project: Yekani Manufacturing Facility – Industrial

Yekani Manufacturing Facility

Description:

Construction of a manufacturing facility for Yekani Manufacturing in the East London Industrial Development Zone (ELIDZ), located in the West Bank area of East London, Eastern Cape. CIDB 9GB

 

Yekani Manufacturing Facility
Yekani Manufacturing Facility

 

Status:

Underway

 

Category:

Building

 

Industry:

Industrial

 

Sector:

Public

Region:

East London, Eastern Cape

 

Value:

Approximately R266 million

 

Timing:

June 2017 to July 2018 (13 months)

 

Class:

Open Tender

 

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details about this Project here
If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.
To view notes with screenshots on how to use our website, please visit our Wiki site.
To view more articles, please visit our blog.

 

Featured Project: Omitiomire Copper Mine, Namibia

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Featured Project: Northridge Mall, Bloemfontein

Description:

Expansion of the Northridge Mall located on the corner of Kenneth Khaunda Rd & Christo Groenewald Street, Bloemfontein, Free State. The current Pick n Pay supermarket will be revamped to the Pick n Pay Group’s national specifications and in addition, a large new full-line Woolworths store will be built, which will consist of a Woolworths Food supermarket combined with a Woolworths Café totalling approximately 1 500m², as well as a Woolworths Clothing section of approximately 3 000m². Dischem will also be revamped. The renovation and construction will take the mall’s gross lettable area to approximately 30 000m² and an additional 600 new parking bays will also be added. A new flagship, free-standing Virgin Active Health Club of 3 700m² is part of the redevelopment. Once the initial redevelopment is successfully completed, the planning of a proposed phase two extension of the mall will commence.

Description:

Status Region
 Underway Bloemfontein, Free State
Category Value
 Building R100 million+
Industry Timing
 Retail, Hospitality & Leisure  July 2017 – April 2019 (22 months)
Sector Class
 Private  Invited/Negotiated

 

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details about this Project here
If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.
To view notes with screenshots on how to use our website, please visit our Wiki site.
To view more articles, please visit our blog.

 

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Featured Project: Transnet Pipelines – Kroonstad Depot

Description: Construction of the fire protection system upgrade, inclusive of demolition, civil, structural, building, mechanical, electrical, instrumentation and control system supply, installation and commissioning at the Kroonstad Depot in Free State. CIDB8ME

Status: Tender

Industry: Industrial

Region: Kroonstad

Sector: Public

Value: R61 Million – R100 Million 

Timing: 2018 onwards

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details click here

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Featured Project: Nongoma Water Supply

Description: Construction of pipelines for the water supply to Nongoma Wards 5, 10, 11, located in KwaZulu-Natal. Estimated project value: R170 million (Incl. VAT). 

Status: Tender

Industry: Water

Region: Nongoma

Sector: Public

Value: R 100 million+ 

Timing: 2017 / 2018

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details click here

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Did you know #DYK – How to search for trending civil tenders?

posted in: Did You Know 4

How to search for trending civil tenders?

If something is “Trending”, it means that it is popular. It is otherwise defined by Oxford Dictionaries as a “general direction in which something is developing or changing”.

 

On the Leads 2 Business system, trending tenders fall within our Reporting feature, and are those tenders that have been viewed the most and/or monitored by the most clients – they have become topics of interest. They are popular.

In this post, we are referring specifically to trending civil tenders.

 

To locate the data on trending tenders, you need to navigate to Reporting:

 

Have a look at the menu on the left-hand side of your screen (while logged in to your profile), and find the “Reporting”.

 

Expand the Reporting menu, and then the Trending sub-menu. You should see an option to view Most Monitored and an option to view Most Viewed tenders. I have highlighted both of these options in the image below. Select the option that you would like to view.

When you click on one of the options, you will see that you land on the Search Results page.

As we are searching for trending civil tenders, the first thing that I would suggest that you do, using the search criteria menu on the left-hand side of your screen, is de-select both Tenders and Projects (the system has automatically selected both) from the Category option (the first option on the search criteria menu).

Expand the Tenders sub-menu (still under the Category option), and only select Infrastructure (civil construction tenders are categorised under the Infrastructure industry).

 

Once you have performed the above changes, your selected search criteria should resemble the images below (the second image is just to show that if you scroll down on the Tenders sub-menu, Infrastructure can be seen, and it has been selected):

Should you wish to, you can narrow the results down even further, by selecting specific Regions, CIDB Gradings, etc.)

 

We also have another wonderful feature on our website, which allows you to view the number of trending tenders on our database in graph form. The data that is depicted on the graph is dependent on the criteria you select.

 

Please navigate to Trending, under the Reporting sub-menu again. This time, click on Market Intelligence > Tenders.

 

You should now find yourself on this page:

The data can be manipulated using the blue All Industries drop-down menu; the green All CIDB Gradings drop-down menu; and the purple All Regions drop-down menu. From each of these options, you can choose a specific industry, CIDB grading, and/or region, or you can leave the options as default “All …”. You can select the Date Range for the data, by using the grey calendar bar at the top right-hand corner above the graph (the options are This Year; One Year Back; Three Years Back; Five Years Back; Ten Years Back; and Custom Range).

 

As an example, let’s say that we would like to see the data for trending civil tenders in KwaZulu-Natal, with no specific CIDB Grading, published in our database between 01 January 2017 to 30 April 2017:

 

We would select Infrastructure from the All Industries drop-down menu. The CIDB drop-down will be left unchanged, and we would select KwaZulu-Natal from the All Regions drop-down menu. The results can be seen in the image below.

I do hope that I have taught you something new about the way in which you can view information on our website and that you can utilise this information to enhance the way in which you carry out your business tasks.

If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.
To view notes with screenshots on how to use our website, please visit our Wiki site.
To view more articles, please visit our blog.

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Featured Project: Maluti-a-Phofung IDZ – Infrastructure

Description: Construction of services and infrastructure for the Maluti-a-Phofung Industrial Development Zone / Industriqwa Industrial Estate, at Maluti-a-Phofung near Harrismith in the Free State. The Tshiame IDZ will focus on automotive, clothing and agro-processing activities. CIDB 9: R130 Million Plus.

Status: Tender

Industry: Infrastructure

Region: Harrismith

Sector: Public

Value: R 100 million+

Timing: 2017 onwards.

Notes: The Closing Date for DTA 624564 has been extended to 13 April 2017. A Copy of the Site Attendance Register has been requested via email, awaiting a response.

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details click here

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Potholes and Pitfalls in civil engineering contracts

Potholes and Pitfalls in civil engineering contracts

Potholes… an infrastructure issue that deserves a whole blog to itself! How often during your travels (be it your annual drive down to your favourite holiday spot, or your daily route to work) do you face the inconvenience of roadworks? I think all of us experience this from time to time. It goes on for months, sometimes even years. Finally, the works are completed and we breathe a sigh of relief. No more queues of traffic or uneven road surfaces, no more narrowing down to one lane. Phew! At last. A few weeks down the line…. a POTHOLE!!?? The blame gets shifted around quite a bit between all the parties involved in the contract, but where does the problem really lie?

 

I must admit. This blog title planted a new “anxiety seed” in my brain, and I found myself trying to put on a civil engineer’s shoes (figuratively, not literally).
I follow the progress of numerous infrastructure projects (but not pothole repairs!) in the department that I work in – the Projects Department. Or more affectionately known as the PP office. A few months (usually about 3 months) after a Tender is advertised for a civil engineering contract, we follow up with the relevant contacts in order to obtain the awarded civil engineering company’s details. We then contact the civil engineer and follow the design process, then the tender and construction progress, until the Project is complete. We do not delve too deep into the issues that may be presented during or after the life-cycle of the project, however, we do try to ascertain if or how those problems will affect the time frame of the development.

 

During my research for this topic, and on more than one occasion, education and training seemed to be a major area of concern when looking at civil engineers in the public sector. South Africa’s public sector appears to have very few professionally registered civil engineers and some of the engineers are placed in positions without possessing the required skills and experience. This could lead to errors in proposals when tendering for contracts and can have serious consequences.

 

Numerous failed infrastructure projects throughout South African history must surely be making things a bit more difficult for companies to win civil contracts. I would imagine that quality standards have been raised in order to improve public health and safety. These standards would hopefully be imposed on both engineering and construction firms, as both (among other professionals) are just as important in the quality of the completed project.

 

One example of a failed project is the collapse of the P166 bridge over the N4 in Mpumalanga in 2009. The beams collapsed and blame was shifted between a speeding truck which caused vibrations while travelling under the bridge, to vibrations caused by jackhammers and manufacturing errors. Another concern was the amount paid for the beams – it was substantially lower in comparison to what other engineers said the beams would usually cost. Sub-standard materials constitute a huge issue and can end in disaster.

 

The Foreshore Freeway Bridge in Cape Town is a well-known incomplete road structure. The bridge was designed in the 60s, and in the early 70s construction commenced. Construction was halted in 1977, apparently due to a lack of funding. However, rumour has it that there was an error in calculations during the design phase and that the two ends of the bridge would fail to meet!

By Flickr user Paul Mannix – https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulmannix/552103944, CC by 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46305687

 

Perhaps one of the most spectacular bridge collapses in the world was that of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge (also nicknamed Galloping Gertie) in the USA, over 76 years ago due to strong winds. The design of the suspension bridge did not allow wind to pass through the sides, causing the bridge to sway and eventually collapse. It only stood for about 4 months after completion before disaster struck. Lessons have been learned and the way in which future suspension bridges are designed, have changed. The parts of the bridge that plunged into Puget Sound have formed a man-made reef, which is protected by the National Register of Historic Places. Click here to see the video, and to see where the bridge got its nickname.

By Barney Elliott; The Camera Shop – Screenshot taken from 16MM Kodachrome motion picture film by Barney Elliott, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=23093518

 

Project failures, such as the ones I have mentioned above, can cast a dark shadow over the industry – an industry which is partly responsible for ensuring that our country’s infrastructure withstands time, utilising taxpayer’s money in a responsible manner. It is critical that we recognise the importance of skilled civil engineers and that employees of the profession look to improve their skills if given the opportunity.

 

Don’t get me wrong, we have some excellent civil engineering structures on our continent. The Maputo / Catembe Bridge, a 680m suspension bridge standing 60m over the water between Maputo and Catembe, is just one example to prove that:

 

Sources:
https://www.businesslive.co.za/fm/features/2017-03-16-cracks-in-the-walls/

http://www.lowvelder.co.za/index.php…news&Itemid=98

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacoma_Narrows_Bridge

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreshore_Freeway_Bridge

http://journals.co.za/docserver/fulltext/civeng/24/2/civeng_v24_n2_a13.pdf?expires=1493899313&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=2EB4C398FA20074700668F139373D9BDhttp://www.africaranking.com/top-10-longest-bridges-africa/3/

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

Featured Project : Ballito Junction

Ballito Junction

Ballito Junction

Description : Expansion of the Ballito Junction shopping centre from 9 313m² to 80 000m², and totaling 130 stores. Once completed, it will be known as Ballito Junction, and will function as the dominant super-regional mall in its area. The mall will comprise four split levels of retail and five parking levels. Development rights that exist on the site allow for the centre to be further expanded to 90 000m². The site is located along Leonora Drive in Ballito, KwaZulu-Natal. Approximate GPS Coordinates, as per Google: -29.526867, 31.203649. Total estimated project value: R 1.6 billion.

Status : Underway

Industry: Building

Region : Ballito

Sector : Private

Value : R 100 million+

Timing : Centre is planned to open in March 2017.

Notes: Construction is still on schedule for completion in March 2017.

If you are a valued Projects subscriber, you can find more details click here Ballito Junction – Building – PPA: 14140.

If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.
To view notes with screenshots on how to use our website, please visit our Wiki site.
To view more articles, please visit our blog.

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

The timing of Tenders – Award Dates

Award Dates

97-blog-award-dates

I work in the Private Projects Department at Leads 2 Business, following the progress of construction developments. Once a project reaches Tender stage, we endeavour to source the award information for the tender linked to that project. In my nearly 5-year experience in dealing with tenders, I have come to learn about a few of the procedures and regulations that need to be adhered to throughout the tendering process. I have no doubt that there is more to learn, but in this blog post I will talk about some of the processes and procedures that I have encountered in the public tendering process, through my understanding.

Public tenders seem to be awarded after a period of between 90 to 120 days from the closing date, however, this time frame could vary – The award can be made before or after this period, provided that the validity period has not expired.

Once the successful bidder is notified, the tender award is not simply finalised with the contract starting immediately thereafter. A public notice should be advertised to indicate the intention to award. There should also be an appeals period, rejection letters, an appointment letter, a contract, and certain construction regulations to adhere to.

Notice of Award / Intention to Award
Once evaluation and adjudication is finalised and a recommendation has been made, the bids should be opened and read out in public, for transparency purposes. A bid register should be published on the client’s website so that the tenderers are able to view the prices that were submitted by the other service providers, should they not have been able to attend the opening of the bids. Successful and unsuccessful tenderers should then be provided with written notice, and a notice of intention to award should be publicly advertised to allow for possible objections from the other bidders.

Appeals Period
Once the intention to award has been advertised, a certain period should be allowed for objections, if any, from other service providers. A tenderer can appeal the award, usually within 14 calendar days (this may differ) from the date of the letter of intent. Clear instructions for the appeals process should be included in the contract documents.

Letter of Appointment
Once the appeals process has concluded, the successful tenderer is issued with an appointment letter. This does not necessarily mean that the award has been finalised. There could be conditions stipulated in the appointment letter which need to be fulfilled before a binding agreement can come into effect.

Binding Contractual Relationship
The contractual relationship begins once the successful bid has been accepted in writing, followed by a written agreement which is signed by both parties. The award can be deemed finalised at this point.

Notification of Construction Work
Should the contract meet the requirements set out in the construction regulation for the Notification of Construction Work, the main contractor must notify the Department of Labour prior to the commencement of construction. A copy of this notice, among other important documents, must be kept in the Occupational Health & Safety File (OH&S File) on site.

Bear in mind that the processes above are not the only ones to consider before the award date is finalised. There are other processes that an award may have to go through, depending on the client’s requirements, the type of goods or services being procured, and even the value of the contract, among others.

The award is not the end of the process. It signals the beginning of the contract.

Sources:
http://www.durban.gov.za/Resource_Centre/Policies/Documents/Sops.pdf
http://www.umdoni.gov.za/index.php/business/scm/processes
http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0ahUKEwiloueggu7PAhXhC8AKHbnGBQ0QFgglMAI&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.gijimakzn.org.za%2FDownloadDocument.aspx%3FNewsDocId%3D90&usg=AFQjCNGj5qz1hK2TutxJUfJwtFPGF_GzXA&sig2=RsLXaa-FqjqOPwX2Hkzc6g
http://www.durban.gov.za/City_Government/Administration/Administrative%20Clusters/treasury/supply_chain_management/Business_Opportunities/Pages/Tender-guidelines.aspx
http://www.kzntreasury.gov.za/Instruction%20Notes/scm-0072006-final-bid-appeals-tribunal-checked.pdf
http://www.polity.org.za/article/successful-tenderers-must-read-letter-of-appointment-carefully-2012-12-11

If you are interested in becoming one of our subscribers, please visit our website.
To view notes with screenshots on how to use our website, please visit our Wiki site.
To view more articles, please visit our blog.

About Bianca Warwick

I had the privilege of joining the Leads 2 Business content team in January 2012. I work in the exciting Projects department, following the progress of construction developments in KwaZulu-Natal and the Free State.

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