10 Interesting Facts about the Eastern Cape

1) Established:
The Eastern Cape was established on the 27th April 1994, before this it was part of the Cape Province. The areas that were taken from the Cape Province to create the Eastern Cape are Transkei, Ciskei and the Eastern portion of the Cape Province.

2) Consists of:
The Eastern Cape is 170 000 Square kilometres of mountain ranges, sandy beaches and even lush forests, stretching from the Southern Drakensburg to Tsitsikamma. It boasts a coastline of 800km from Cape Francis all the way to the Wild Coast.

3) Climate:
The climate in the Eastern Cape is subtropical and is mild towards the North. With hot summers the winters are cold with snowfall towards the northern mountains. The annual precipitation increases by 550MM between Graaff-Reinet in the West and East London in the East.

4) Harbours:
The Eastern Cape is the only province that has 3 harbours, namely Port Elizabeth, East London and Ngqura. The trio of ports connects South Africa to the global economy.

5) Wild Life:
Big 5, no!  The Eastern Cape is home to the big 7, namely the Great White Shark, Southern Right Whale, Buffalo, Leopard, Elephant, Rhino and majestic Lion.

6) Adventure:
If adventure and pure adrenalin are what you are after the Bloukrans River Bridge is the place to be for the very popular bungee jumping. The bridge spans 451 meters in length and hangs 216 meters above the Bloukrans River, it is situated near Nature’s Valley and was built between 1980 and 1983 by Concor.  

7) Sport:
The Eastern Province boasts a premier rugby team namely the Isuzu Southern Kings whose home ground is the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Port Elizabeth that is appropriately named after a local hero, icon and former president of South Africa Nelson Mandela. The Isuzu Southern Kings are one of only two teams that represent South Africa in the Guinness Pro14 tournament overseas.

8) Automotive:
The Eastern Cape is home of Volkswagen South Africa, Mercedes-Benz, Isuzu and Ford Motors. The Province manufactures 50% of the Country’s passenger vehicles and also exports 51% of the vehicles that are manufactured here.

9) Agriculture:
The Eastern Cape has fertile soil and due to this is able to produce many different products that include Fruit, Chicory, Olives, Tea, coffee and maize.

10) Icons:
Former president Nelson Mandela, Former president Thabo Mbeki, Walter Sisulu and Oliver Tambo are some of the icons that were born and bred in the Eastern Cape.

Sources:
Global Africa Network
Wikipedia
South African Hotels
Wikipedia EC
IOL
Wikipedia Bloukrans
Visit Eastern Cape
Britannica
Wiki


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About Karen Garner-Savory

I started working at Leads 2 Business in May 2009, and have served as Head of Department of Telesales and Administration from 2010 until the present. I oversee both the Telesales department as well as the Administration of our Johannesburg Office.

Tips for Blasting

Tips for Blasting
Blasting

Firstly we need to know what blasting is. It is a technically controlled, effective and safe way to break rock for excavation. It is primarily used in Civil Engineering, Mining and Quarrying for roads and dam construction.

What explosives are used for blasting?

It is a common misconception that dynamite or gunpowder are used for most blasting activities but it is rather the engineered blasting agents that account for approximately 90% of explosive material used.
Ammonium Nitrate mixed with either sodium nitrate or calcium nitrate is the most common product and pound for pound the more effective explosive.

 

What is involved in Blasting?

• Holes are drilled into the rock and filled with explosives. The more solid the rock the more explosives will be needed.
• Proper ventilation is required to remove not only the dust but also the combustion gases from the explosion. This needs to be done before work can be resumed.
• The rock then collapses once detonation takes place.
• The debris is removed and if need be reinforcing is put in place before further work takes place.
• The entire blast lasts up to 1 second.

Blasting

Steps to be considered before blasting takes place:

• Fragmentation desired – take into consideration size of digging equipment and crushing equipment needed on the project.
• Rock quality/character – state of the area being blasted, is the rock hard or soft and is the area dry or wet.
• Site limitations – is the area to be blasted near other structures or properties.
• Safety limitations – are there any electrical hazards
• Equipment limitations – are all equipment needed for the project available

 

Random facts about blasting

• Blasting is now considered routine work in the mining industry.
• Geological or Geotechnical knowledge is needed to ensure effectiveness and safety.
• Blasting involves design and patterns, not just “blowing” stuff up…
• The result of rock blasting is often called rock cut.
• Mining and Construction are the 2 most common uses for explosives.

Blasting

 

Sources:
www.wikipedia.org/wiki
www.railsystem.net
www.miningandblasting.wordpress.com

 

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About Karen Garner-Savory

I started working at Leads 2 Business in May 2009, and have served as Head of Department of Telesales and Administration from 2010 until the present. I oversee both the Telesales department as well as the Administration of our Johannesburg Office.

Did you Know #DYK: Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)

Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)

Sick Building Syndrome also known as SBS is a medical condition that often comprises of a range of non-specific symptoms that occur in the workplace or building and its occupants. This syndrome causes the occupants to have a feeling of ill health which in turn causes a ripple effect starting from absenteeism to a decrease in workers productivity. As a result, SBS is fast becoming a major occupational hazard. Therefore all factors such as cause, management, preventative measures and employer responsibility need to be ascertained and looked at.

Symptoms:

  • Headaches
  • Respiratory problems
  • Nausea
  • Flu like symptoms
  • Fatigue
  • Poor concentration
  • Skin irritations
  • Increase in asthma attacks

Risk factors:

  • Chemical contaminants
  • Biological contaminants
  • Inadequate ventilation
  • Electromagnetic radiation
  • Psychological factors
  • Poor lighting, absence of light & humidity

Prevention & control:

In order to minimize or completely prevent SBS it is important to ensure the building has good ventilation, if an air conditioning unit is used it is important to keep it well maintained at all times and ensure that ventilation standards are met, ensure intake vents are not located in areas that could be close to large amounts of traffic.

Products below should be checked for safety:

  • Paint
  • Adhesives
  • Pesticides
  • Cleaning agents

Other contaminants that need to be watched for:

  • Mold
  • Insect & bird droppings
  • Stagnant water (this breeds bacteria, viruses & fungus)

To reduce the effects of using equipment that omit electromagnetic radiation, it is important to correctly ground wiring to reduce magnetic fields that affect your health.
High stress levels and long working hours can affect one’s ability to remain healthy and productive. Stress can weaken your immune system and psychological wellbeing.
There is a greater link of SBS in air conditioned buildings than those that are naturally ventilated.

Employer’s responsibility:

  • Carry out surveys with your employees
  • Ensure all cleaning machinery is in good working order & that filters are clean
  • Ensure cleaning agents are being used correctly & stored correctly
  • Ensure the ventilation unit is well maintained
  • Ensure the intake for the ventilation system is checked
  • When possible, use natural ventilation
  • Ensure staff schedule their work properly to ensure less stress
  • Ensure staff take regular breaks and step away from their work space
  • Encourage staff to eat healthy and get regular exercise

 

Sources:

http://www.nhs.uk/Search/?q=sick+building+syndrome

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2796751/

Sick Emoji

Stethoscope on heart

Hazard sign

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About Karen Garner-Savory

I started working at Leads 2 Business in May 2009, and have served as Head of Department of Telesales and Administration from 2010 until the present. I oversee both the Telesales department as well as the Administration of our Johannesburg Office.

L2B Blog: Mastering the art of cold calling, tips for successful B2B Sales

Mastering the art of cold calling, tips for successful B2B Sales

Mastering the art of cold calling, tips for successful B2B sales

Cold calling provides selling opportunities to your external sales team, it’s the ability to interact with potential subscribers and entice them into wanting to know more about your company and what you can offer. It can be a very challenging career to have as you do come across some individuals that don’t particularly like interacting with telesales staff. That being said, we have the privilege of interacting with some of the nicest people within our industry.

Telesales staff must be highly motivated individuals who have a sales spirit and enjoy interacting with people, they need to be confident and ensure they take nothing personally. Curiosity is vital to ensure success in cold calling.

When calling a potential client the fundamentals are:

  • Doing your homework – It is important to ensure you gather as much information about the client before you call, potential clients appreciate an agent who has done their homework.
  • Contact with the correct person – this will increase your level of success; the decision maker will see potential in an idea that will grow their business.
  • Listening skills – understanding what the potential client requires in order for them to get things done in an easy no fuss manner, business owners want results.
  • Asking the correct questions – in order to ascertain how we can best assist them in satisfying their business’s needs. Ensure your timing is correct; if they sound busy rather suggest calling them back.
  • Knowledge – You cannot sell what you don’t understand so knowledge is definitely important, if you know your product or service you are able to answer questions efficiently.
  • Attitude – towards your potential client is equally important, if you believe in your product or service the potential client will be more inclined to have a look at what you offer.
  • Confidence – When you sound confident in your ability to lead them to the right product or service they will be open to listening to your sales call.
  • Tone on the phone – We speak to a variety of potential clients from all walks of life and it is very important to establish a rapport over the phone, ensuring you don’t use jargon that is not always understood.

 

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try one more time.” – Thomas A Edison

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About Karen Garner-Savory

I started working at Leads 2 Business in May 2009, and have served as Head of Department of Telesales and Administration from 2010 until the present. I oversee both the Telesales department as well as the Administration of our Johannesburg Office.